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Vivian's Girls consists of 10 black and white videotapes (1/2" reel to reel), each lasting approximately 30 minutes, produced and directed by Andy Warhol and Vincent Fremont.

About Vivian's Girls, Warhol scholar Patrick Smith wrote: "For a one-year period at the same time that Warhol produced Pork, the artist videotaped Vivian's Girls. Similar in spirit to his film Chelsea Girls, this television program, which has never been released is a series of encounters by Warhol's associates. Vivian's Girls is a soap opera that was taped twice a week in Warhol's studio. It concerns a boarding house owned by the title character. From what little is known about it, Warhol used stock characters, improvised dialogue and a single set." (PS184)

John G. Hanhardt (Curator Whitney Museum Film and Video and Director of The Andy Warhol Film Project - 1991):

"During this time, Warhol was involved in developing, with Vincent Fremont, ideas and scripts for television. The first of these, Vivian's Girls (1973), was to be a television show loosely structured around a group of models and drag queens who were living together. Shot on location, it featured Brigid (Polk) Berlin, Candy Darling, Nancy North, Paul Palmero, and others. The production, which was never finally edited or shown, played with soap opera forms and, according to Fremont (who scripted it), was inspired by both The Chelsea Girls (1966) and Gregory La Cava's Stage Door (1937). Vivian's Girls evolved into another video production, Phoney (1973)..." (VT4)

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Andy Warhol