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John McHale Jr. Interview Footnotes

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1.The Expendable Ikon: Works by John McHale (exh. cat.) (Buffalo, NY: The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, 1984), p. 43:

Reyner Banham:

"Among the project-concepts left unfinished at his [John McHale (Sr)'s] shockingly early death in 1978 was The Future of the Past, a sharp and paradoxical title for an investigation of what was to become of history. Two memorial conferences were held to wrestle with the topic. They were a necessary if almost unbelievable mixture of academics, artists, historians, politicians, civil servants, poets, bankers, and a few just plain folks of intelligence or talent who had gotten plugged into his life and work somewhere along the way. They spoke with elegance and wit, precision and perception. They coined phrases and ran ideas up flagpoles. They challenged, received opinion, clambered over the boundaries between disciplines, and stood the world on its ear, all things that McHale had done every day of the week, except that it took eight or ten of them to do what he could do as a solo act. And they never managed to deliver a final statement with quite the terse economy or flash of vision that came naturally to this scholar-artist, this Father of Pop."

2. John McHale, "The expendable ikon 1," and "The expendable ikon 2," Architectural Design (London), Vol. XXIX, February and March 1959.

3. David Robbins (ed.), The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty (exh. cat.) (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1990), p. 28.

4. Marco Livingstone, Pop Art: A Continuing History (London: Thames & Hudson Ltd., 1990), p. 34.

5. The Cordells were Frank and his wife, Magda. Magda would later marry John McHale (Sr). Frank Cordell was a member of the Independent Group and a professional musician. He would later go on to do movie soundtracks - including Khartoum in 1966. He won the Academy Award in 1970 for the soundtrack of Cromwell.

6. Lawrence Alloway, "The Development of British Pop," in Lucy R. Lippard, Pop Art (London: Thames & Hudson, Ltd., 1966), p.27.

7. Hans Ulrich Obrist, "Pop Daddy" (Interview with Richard Hamilton), Tate Magazine (London), Issue No. 4, March/April 2003.

8. A copy of the letter from Richard Hamilton to the architects, Peter and Alison Smithson, can be found here.

9. Richard Hamilton, Collected Words 1953 - 1982 (London: Thames & Hudson, Ltd., 1982), p. 28.

10. By "MIT document" McHale (Jr.) is referring to Robbins (ed.) as above.

11. A brief history of the comic book which mentions the Senate hearings can be found here.

12. The BBC Radio 3 interview can be found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/johntusainterview/hamilton_transcript.shtml.

13. David Robbins (ed.), The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty (exh. cat.) (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1990), p. 190.

14. Richard Hamilton, Collected Words 1953 - 1982 (London: Thames & Hudson, Ltd., 1982), p. 22.

15. See BBC here.

16. This exhibition has also been referred to as "Artist vs. Machine." See Artfacts here.

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